Zines for kids

Hands with scissors and markersI love sharing zines with all kinds of audiences, and have been leading zine-making and zine history workshops with campers at Girls Rock NC summer camp for about a decade. One big challenge is finding zines that are appropriate for ages as young as 7-8 through high school. Kids are always eager to point out any “bad” words they find, and can be a tough crowd! I eventually started making my own mini-zines about women musicians since I had a hard time finding things I could share. I am always on the lookout for all-audience zines, and over the past few years other folks have asked about these as well.

What does “kid friendly” mean? Think about G-rated movies, and if in doubt, err on the side of caution. No bad language–and be liberal (or is that conservative?) with what might be “bad.” No naked pictures or sexual content beyond hugs and (chaste) kisses. Keep it to topics kids can understand or relate to– some of the science zines are fine content-wise, but are they about insects or particle physics? (Not that 2nd graders aren’t into physics, but you know what I mean.)

Kid-friendly zines that are free to download or cheap to buy: pile of zines

Tips for finding or making your own kid-friendly zines:

  • If you want to make multiple copies of any zines you purchase, ask the creator. I have found that many people are open to this since they often want to share the love of zines. Or ask if you can pay extra when you purchase and then make copies. Keep it ethical!
  • Try searching Etsy.com for “your mellow and innocent topic” plus “zine” and see what comes up. Sometimes “girl” + “zine” = zines that are perfect for Girls Rock camp, and sometimes it doesn’t. DIY zine is another good search to try. I always end up spending a few bucks on things for myself, so be warned!
  • Sometimes I go ahead and buy zines when I’m not sure if they are G-rated. I can afford to just keep the DIY zines with gratuitous swears or inappropriate crafts, but if you’re in doubt and don’t want to risk it, just message the seller.

Please add any other suggestions to the comments!

Mental Health Zines

As part of LIS Mental Health Week, the Zine Librarians listserv crowdsourced a list of zines related to mental health that we love.

zines with personal narratives of mental health/illness
April Fools Day, by Kathleen Hanna
Kathleen Hanna, lead singer of riot grrrl band Bikini Kill, writes about her struggle with alcoholism and its effect on her life in this personal zine. Also included are non-destructive ways to get high, things that are better when sober, and a conversation about addiction with Brian Starhawk of Fitz of Depression. Read it in a library.

Clark 8, by Megan Gendell
A college student documents her stay in a mental health ward. Read it in a library.

Collide: on physical and mental health, edited by JC Parker
This compilation zine put together by JC presents personal essays from people living with physical disabilities and some form of mental illness including debilitating migraines, PTSD, suicidal ideation, brain injury, chronic pain, rheumatoid arthritis, depression, seizures, deafness and anxiety. Many of the contributors, including one who is genderqueer, have a family history of alcoholism and/or have their own issues with addiction. Contributors include Maranda Elizabeth, Kerri Radley and Sara Bear. There are also photographs, illustrations and recommended resources. Read it in a library, or buy from Stranger Danger Distro.

Doll Hospital, by Bethany Lamont
“It’s an art and literature mental health journal which encourages an intersectional focus. Rooted in self-advocacy, it centres the voices of those who are largely unheard in the mainstream narrative of mental health. It aims to be an alternative and does an excellent job of it. It takes submission from anyone who has experienced mental health illness firsthand and wants to talk about it in their own words and on their own terms.” (Quoted from this interview with the creator.) Buy from their website.

Filling the Void: Interviews about quitting drinking and using, edited by Cindy and Caty Crabb
A collection of interviews with people who have quit drinking or using drugs, about why they quit, the process, and their experiences.
Buy from Doris Zine Distro.

Functionally Ill (multiple issues) by Laura-Marie
In this zine, subtitled “Adventures with Mental Health” and “becoming bipolar”, Laura-Marie discusses what depression and mania feel like for her and describes her voices. Read in a library, or buy from the author.

Get a grip: travels through my mental health by Sarah Tea-Rex
Subjects: Sexual consent, Adult child sexual abuse victims. Download the pdf from the author.

Pathologize this!: a zine about mental health, edited by Sarah Tea-Rex, Rachel and Iris E.
Pathologize This! shares people’s mostly autobiographical stories of their experiences with mental illness. Issue 1 chronicles life with obsessive-compulsive disorder, eating disorders, alcoholism, chronic pain, depression, anxiety disorders, and as a sexual abuse survivor. There is also an essay about Elliott Smith and how many people use music to cope with illness. Issue 2 features writings on Attention Deficit Disorder, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, manic depression, unnecessarily prescribed medications, suicide attempts, and the story of an artist turning their an anxiety disorder into a project. Download issue 1 and issue 2 from the authors.

Srviv 1-3, edited by Jonas
Some of the world’s best zine writers answer the question “Why I get out of bed every morning.” The results are beautiful, challenging, and inspiring. Buy from Antiquated Future distro or others.

Think About the Bubbles (multiple issues) by Joyce Hatton
“#8 A illustrated zine about my breast cancer journey, getting sober, depression, my suicide attempt, homelessness, and how breast cancer ended up making my life really awesome. #9 I went on the POC Zine Project Race Riot Tour. I learned a lot about racism, internalized racism, and how living my life in North and South Dakota has affected me. #11 A story about my lifelong BFF named Anxiety, and our destructive relationship. Lots of illustrations. #13 Mental health things, my relationship with my mother, purse-clutching, and birds. Also cancer, the Simpsons, and videogames. #14 A short comic about mental illness and isolation. Contains surreal and potentially disturbing imagery.” Read in a library or buy from the author.

“Unhealthy” : on coping with pain in socially inappropriate ways by Mika
Mika, a childhood sexual abuse survivor, challenges the recommended compulsory positivity approach to coping with personal and external (e.g., massive earthquake in Japan) trauma and instead argues that there is no “healthy” or “unhealthy” way to cope. She outlines her personal, albeit controversial, strategies, including lowering her expectations, thinking about her own irrelevance in the world, pondering the practicality of suicide after her own failed attempt, and affiliating with Buddhism. This zine is issued with a trigger-warning.

Wax and Feathers, by members of The Icarus Project
“In expressing our feelings, insights, and ideas about madness and the world around us we hope to inform and inspire others. The stories told by the psychiatric establishment, pharmaceutical industry, and the mainstream media all to often overshadow our own. By sharing our stories with others we can reclaim the right to define ourselves and our experiences. We choose to honor our uniqueness and complexity by letting our voices be heard.” Download from the Icarus Project.

self-care zines
The bad day book by LB Lee
“Made to be folded up and put in your wallet, this is a little pocket zine intended for general mental health crisis situations–dissociative episodes, psychotic episodes, suicidality, stuff like that. Obviously, this is not a replacement for a thorough crisis plan, just a quick and dirty resource for when you’re not thinking clearly.” Buy from the author.

Ease your mind: herbs for mental health, by Janet Kent
This zine serves as “a primer on the use of medicinal herbs to support mental health.” Arranged by symptom rather than by plant, each entry includes the plant’s common and Latin name, and a description of what kinds of symptoms or emotional states they are best suited to address, including anxiety, depression, grief, and insomnia. Includes a section on dosage and contraindications, a glossary, bibliography, and a brief overview of how to make teas, decoctions, and tinctures. Read in a library, or buy from the author.

Eat this sandwich by LB Lee
“Made to be folded up and put in your wallet, this is a little pocket zine intended to fight restriction urges–the psychological compulsion not to eat. Obviously, this is not a replacement for a thorough treatment plan, just a quick and dirty resource for when you’re having trouble getting food into your face. Methods true and tested!” Buy from the author.

Feeling worthless? by LB Lee
“Made to be folded up and put in your wallet, this is a tiny little pocket zine intended to help deal with… well, feelings of worthlessness.” Read in a library, or buy from the author.

The worth of water: a compzine about self-care, edited by Sarah Rose
This compzine provides articles on stress relief activities and self-care. Contributors in their 20s and 30s talk about their love for John Waters films, making films, activist burnout coping techniques, and overcoming addiction. Contributors include Sage Adderly (Tattooed Memoirs), Sarah Arr! (Tazewell’s Favorite Eccentric), Laura-Marie (Functionally Ill), JC (Tributaries), and others. The zine also includes recipes, illustrations and a list of resources. Read in a library.

Other fantastic lists of mental health zines available at: https://bitchmedia.org/article/cut-paste-zines-about-mental-health-and-self-care AND http://www.soularbliss.com/2012/07/31/radical-self-care-and-community-care-zine-resources/

Consent Zines

Here’s a selective, annotated list, alphabetically by author:

  1. Break the Silence Northwest

Consent is My Operating System

This zine features sample conversations to help people learn how to ask for and get consent. Free for download at http://nwbreakthesilence.files.wordpress.com/2009/09/consent-workshop2.pdf

  1. Crabb, Cindy Ed.

Learning Good Consent

This is an edited and updated version of the Learning Good Consent zine. Among other topics, it has articles on consent for queer people, an outline for a consent workshop, and a resource list. Held at Brooklyn College, Barnard, Sarah Lawrence, Indiana University, West Bend Community Memorial Library, Schlesinger Library at Harvard, Plymouth Regional High School Zine Library, Rainbow Resource Center Library, Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh Sallie Bingham Center at Duke.

  1. Crabb, Cindy Ed.

Support

This zine contains helpful information for victims of sexual abuse and their allies on topics from active listening to safe sex. Held at Bowling Green University, Swarthmore College, Michigan State University Libraries, New York University, Brooklyn College, Barnard Library, FAQ Library, Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh, University of Maryland Women’s Center Sallie Bingham Center at Duke.

  1. Crabb, Cindy Ed.

See No Speak No Hear No: Articles and Questions about Sexual Assault

 Various pieces from survivors’ and accused peoples’ perspectives. Held at Barnard Library, Indiana University Libraries, Multnomah County Library, University of Maryland Women’s Center, Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh.

  1. Jamie

Thoughts About Community Support Around Intimate Violence

This is a guide for learning how communities can support both perpetrators and survivors to work through instances of sexual assault. Held at Wisconsin Historical Society, Multnomah County Library, Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh, University of Maryland Women’s Center, National Library of Scotland.

  1. Molasses

My Feminist Manifesta: A Call-Out to Men

“I don’t want to see my friends raped and murdered, sexually assaulted and sexually harassed, afraid to travel and scared to walk home alone at night. I want to see change. Radical change. I want to see it in my lifetime, however long or short it may be. I hope this zine is a start…” Held at National Library of Australia,

  1. Neckmonster, Cheyenne

Ask First

“this zine is a guide to assisting others with their issues, and confronting our own. Hopefully you can take the information in here and use it as inspiration to work towards the liberation of all people – abused or not.” Held at Gustavus Adolphus College, Cowley Library, Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh.

8, 9, 10. Thunder Collective

What Do We Do When? A Zine About Community Response to Sexual Assault #s 1, 2 and 3

These zines, which are collections of stories, articles, interviews and other types of writing, were designed to be companions to workshops presented by Australian Thunder Collective as a resource for people thinking about how assault affects communities and thinking about how to respond. Held at Barnard College, National Library of Australia, Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh.

+++ Note on holdings: I searched WorldCat and LibraryThing. Let me know in the comments if you have these items and weren’t listed as such.

Unreproductive: Zines on Herbal Abortion and Menstrual Extraction

Here are some zines that discuss or even detail ways to end a pregnancy. Please be careful with how you carry out instructions found in a zine, or really any information resource. Neither I nor anyone from the zine librarians group is taking responsibility for the content found in the zines. Zines do not go through a peer review process and most zine makers do not have significant medical training. That doesn’t mean they don’t have valid knowledge about their own bodies and yours, but, just, don’t be reckless.

So here is a selective, annotated list, alphabetically by title:

  1. Doris #23 by Cindy Crabb, published in 2006.
    An explanation of menstrual extraction is just one part of this issue Cindy Crabb’s rightfully celebrated personal zine. In addition to ME, you’ll also read about Cindy’s grandma, outdoor adventures and the lasting effects of childhood sexual abuse. The zine is illustrated with stick figure comics and drawings in Cindy’s inimitable style. Cindy and Doris are hard not to love.
    Held at: Bako Zine Library, Barnard Zine Library/Columbia University, Bingham Center/Duke University, Carnegie Library of PittsburghDenver Zine Library, Multnomah County Library, Nadine Vorhoff Library/Tulane UniversityPierce County Library System, Timberland Regional Library. You can also buy it from Cindy and from a bunch of distros (which you can look up on your own).
  2. Fertility Awareness for Non-Invasive Birth Control, by the Arthouse Coalition, Portland OR
    I’m a sucker for a DIY zine that includes a bibliography and glossary, which this one does. As the title suggests, this zine is more about knowing your body and preventing pregnancy than it is about abortion, but it does contain information about herbal emmenagogues. And if you want to know a lot about cervical fluid, this is the zine for you!
    Held at: Bingham Center/Duke UniversityFirefly Zine collection/University of MiamiInternet Archive (options for viewing and download), Papercut Zine Library, Schlesinger Library/HarvardZineLibrary.info (pdf)
  3. Free to Choose: a Women’s Guide to Reproductive Freedom, by Esther Eberhardt. (Note the Eberhardt Press catalog title leave’s out the word “Women’s,” hence some irregularity in library catalogs.
    In addition to being pretty this pamphletty zine provides history and context (stories from the “bad old days,” The Abortion Handbook, Jane), as well as information about menstrual extraction tools and procedures. It includes a short list of bibliographical references and is anti-copyright.
    Held at: AnarchaLibrary (link to pdf), Barnard Zine Library/Columbia University, Bingham Center/Duke University, Birds Nest Zine LibraryBrooklyn College,  Carnegie Library of PittsburghCleveland Health Science Library, Eberhardt Press (pdf), Evergreen State College Womyn’s Resource CenterHampshire CollegeMount Royal UniversitySchlesinger Libary/Harvard, Timberland Regional LibraryUniversity of Oregon, Vancouver Public Library
  4. Hot Pantz: Do It Yourself Gynecology, by Isabelle Gauthier and Lisa Vinebaum, 1995
    This is a classic women’s repro health DIY guide, originally published in French. Includes emmenagogues and advice for what to do to prevent pregnancy after a risky sexual encounter.
    Held at: Barnard Zine Library/Columbia University, Bingham Center/Duke UniversityBitchMedia Community Lending Library, Bowling Green State University, Carnegie Library of PittsburghCleveland Health Science Library, Duke University/Bingham Center, Multnomah County Library, Firefly Zine Collection/University of MiamiNo Borders Radical Lending Library (link to pdf that isn’t working for me), Roberts Street Social Centre, Timberland Regional LibraryUniversity of Oregon
  5. Mine: an Anthology of Women’s Choices, edited by Meredith Stern, 2002.
    You won’t necessarily get the recipe for an herbal abortion or instructions for performing menstrual extraction. What this compilation zine will provide is other women’s stories about medical and surgical abortions, herbal abortifacients, menstrual extractions and the women’s thought processes behind their decisions.
    Held at: Barnard Zine Library/Columbia University, Bingham Center/Duke University, Labadie Collection/University of MichiganSchlesinger Library/Harvard University, Wisconsin Historical Society
  6. Radical Menstruation, 2004.
    Here’s the Barnard zine abstract: This political zine gives alternative ways to view and deal with menstruation, focusing on herbal and DIY remedies. It also critiques of the “culture of shame and ignorance” surrounding menstruation, provides a bibliography, and provides instructions on how to make a cloth pad or perform a menstrual extraction.
    Held at: Barnard Zine Library/Columbia University, Bowling Green State University
  7. Red Alert #3, by the Blood Sisters collective, early 2000s?
    Contains an emmenagogue recipe.
    Held at: Barnard Zine Library/Columbia University, Bingham Center/Duke University, OPIRG Infoshop
  8. She’s So Very, by Melissa Ann, 2008?
    Mostly a personal zine, about a lot of topics, this zine also includes an emmenagogue recipe–and interviews with Le Tigre band members about feminism, if you’re into that sort of thing.
    Held at Barnard Zine Library/Columbia University, Brooklyn College
  9. What Is This Thing Called M.E.? 2006 or later?
    Personal, DIY, cut and paste goodness–how have I never heard of this zine before?
    Held at: Papercut Zine Library (spreadsheet of holdings), pdf from unidentified source (RAM sucking download that might freeze your browser for a while)
  10. Wive’s Tales by Britton, 1993
    Here’s the Barnard abstract to another classic zine that still shows up at books fairs, zine fests and in distros, 20 years after it was published): This political DIY zine gives alternatives routes to female reproductive health. Included are guides to self-examination and forms of birth control, emmenagogues, and childbirth, as well as descriptions of diseases and tips for radical menstruation. There are illustrations and a bibliography.
    Held at: Barnard Zine Library/Columbia University, Bingham Center/Duke University, DePaul University (Kim Nolan collection), Forgotten Zine ArchiveInternet Archive (options for viewing and download), Smith CollegeTamiment Library/NYU, University of Iowa

Note, re: library holdings. I searched WorldCat and did an internet search. I have surely missed other libraries, whose catalogs are not online or whose holdings are not otherwise represented on the open web or for whatever reason don’t show up very high on a results list. Librarians should feel encouraged to add their holdings in this post or in the comments for me to integrate as I am able.

Zines for Teens

This question comes up routinely on the ZineLibrarians list, and yet I’ve never seen a nice list.

If others will provide the titles (and annotations would be nice, too!) , I’ll be responsible for posting them here. Suggest something in the comments or email them to me.

I don’t work with pre-college teens and so don’t have a good sense of what is appropriate/will fly, but I’m suggesting a few zines anyway, just to get the list started.

  • 12 items or less : a grocery shopping zine edited by A.J. Michel
  • Adorn, by Bree Friend. The last issue I’ve seen is from 2006, and Bree is 22 and separated or divorced. Teens like to read about folks slightly older than themselves, right? Bree’s zines are very visual, and I gotta say cute. heartlikefoil@ hotmail
  • After School Special by Nia King
  • Art Freak by Carol Parks
  • Bad Grades by Carla Marie Yacenda
  • Beards? Beards!: and other matters pertaining to facial hair by Ingrid
  • Best Zine Ever edited by Greg Means. Zine reviews, many written by librarians.
  • Call & response by Gianni Simone
  • Caboose, #4 Ridiculous Issue by Liz Mason
  • Caesar by Jeff Sharp
  • Clutch by Clutch McBastard. Daily minicomic by a librarian. I don’t recall the language getting much worse than the author’s nom de plume.
  • Controller by Robin Enrico
  • Danger! Hole, by high school student Lucy in the Sky. Bravely feminist, riot grrrl oriented zine, with different themes each issue. grrrlriots8me @ hotmail
  • Diary of a mosquito abatement man by John Porcellino.
  • Do you work here? by Nathalie Wilson.
  • Don’t go where I can’t follow by Anders Nilsen with Cheryl Weaver.(Actually a book we have as a zine)
  • Doris 15: antidepression guide by Cindy Crabb.
  • Dropping out (for students), by Cavegirl is available for download from Crimethinc, and it’s just what it sounds like. It discusses dropping out of high school and how to get by. It’s about one person who couldn’t tolerate school, but it’s not especially disrespectful.
  • The Dvorak zine : changing the world one keyboard at a time by Alec Longstreth
  • The East Village Inky by Ayun Halliday. Handwritten and illustrated mamazine by a Brooklyn mom with two young kids and a Tony award winning spouse.
  • Empower : a young mama’s guide to taking control, by Allison Crews. This is the kind of stuff that is actually useful to a pregnant or parenting teen, because the people that wrote the articles have been there. allison @ girlmom .com (not sure if the link is still good. The copyright statement encourages copying and distribution, so write me if you want a copy.
  • Extranjero, # 5 : tales of life and travel by a big, dumb Yank & his Spanish wife by Kris and Lola.
  • The Fall by Stephanie Wu
  • Figure 8, by Krissy Durden. One of the best zines out there on fat acceptance and debunking bullshit about health risks and other issues. ponyboypress @ yahoo
  • First semester : chronicles of the classroom by Jeff Sharp
  • Flummery by Jeff Sharp
  • The Future Generation by China Martens. Anti-authoritarian parenting zine.
  • Girls are not chicks coloring book, and anything else by Jacinta Bunnell. These are great feminist, genderfucking zines and coloring books (that don’t use naughty words like genderfucking).
  • Glossolalia, by Sarah Contrary. Sarah is a mad bike enthusiast from PDX who does all these macho solo bike trips around the US and Europe, which is very inspirational. She’s also an excellent writer and artist, in her 20s. She writes about feminism and sex discrimination in a way that I hope teens will take to. enormajean @ hotmail
  • Gschwandtner, Design by A. Lucille Shanik
  • Guardians of the Kingdom by Tom Gauld
  • Hello, my name is : a ‘zine about how people got their names by Cristina Montejo
  • Here it is by Erin Tobey
  • Hey 4-Eyes edited by Robyn Chapman
  • Hunter & painter by Tom Gauld
  • In a Lonely place by Jeff Sharp
  • In which I think about drowning by Josie Whitmore
  • Infandum, #2 by Molly Lawless
  • Invincible Summer by Nicole Georges. Minicomics by queer, vegan, zine workshop leader, band member, animal lover, etc.
  • King-cat Comics by John Porcellino
  • Knit Knit edited by Luren Jenison, Concept by Sabrina
  • Kyle Bravo’s punk rock guide to saving money, fighting capitalism, & having fun while you’re at it by Kyle Bravo
  • La Primavera by Alexis Frederick-Frost. Actually a graphic novel, rather than a zine?
  • Ladyfriend : for ladies and all their friends, by Christa. Each issue has a different theme. Check the website and decide for yourself how teen friendly you think they’ll be.
  • A late freeze by Danica Novgorodoff (an awesome comic but has a drawing of a bear giving birth – just FYI in case your community says “NO!” to bear genitalia)
  • Laundry basket, April 2002 : tales of washday woe : come clean with us and let us dye for you.
  • Long tail kitty : outer space by Lark Pien.
  • Lower East Side librarian winter solstice shout out by Jenna Freedman. Personal zine by NYC librarian. Book and zine reviews, journal entries essays about jobs, activism, and in recent issues, married life.
  • Leeking Ink by Davida Gypsy Breier. Personal zine by now 30something zine mainstay.
  • List, by Ramsey Beyer. Her zines are comprised of her own lists, as well as those contributed by others or that she just finds in the street. Ramsey is a straightedge vegan punk art student, who doesn’t have a potty mouth. The illustrations are great and the list style makes it super accessible. ramseybeyer @ gmail
  • Make something an anthology of Portland zinesters edited by Greig Means.
  • Maria of Montmartre by Alexis Frederick-Frost.
  • The monkey & the crab by Sara Edward-Corbett and Shawn Cheng
  • The most romantic wedding in human history by Christoph Meyer
  • My brain hurts by Liz Baillie
  • On being jealous of invertabrates, volumes 1 and 3 by Jess S. One cel minicomics. Adorable.
  • On subbing : the first four years by Dave. About being a substitute teacher’s assistant working with special needs kids. PDX punk rock vegan straightedge.
  • Ouija interviews by Sarah Becan (very dark but not worse than a lot of YA fiction)
  • Out of water / by Matthew Bernier
  • Peko peko, #1, winter 2001 : a zine about food
  • Personal charm : a collection of comics by zine queen Missy Kulik ; edited by Jordan Weeks
  • Phase 7 by Alec Longstreth
  • Platform : notes from the underground by Elizabeth Genco
  • Potluck, April 2004 : a cooking compilation A.J. Michel
  • Positive consumption Jenny Ferretti
  • Regina Rich middle school detective, issue #1 : the missing money!
  • Scars Alex Longstreth
  • Scout, #6 : food and cooking issue
  • Scratch, queer youth peer education. Issues 4 and 5 available for download via QZAP
  • Scrappy, #1 : a crafty zine for scrappy people / Niku
  • Secret mystery love shoes, #3 Androo Robinson and Maria Goodman
  • Shut eye by Sarah Becan, based on a story by David Becan
  • Sidewalk bump 1 and 2 ed by Dan Moynihan
  • Simple Routines by JP Coovert
  • Skate tough you little girls by Celia C. Perez is a fanzine about women’s skateboarding. Should be accessible to all teen readers. perezeeb @ yahoo
  • Slave to the needles
  • Squarecat comics, vol. 1 / by Jennifer Omand.
  • Stolen sharpie revolution : a diy zine resource ed Alex Wrekk. Pretty much the go to guide for zine making and zine community and resources info.
  • A strange day Damon Hurd & Tatiana Gill.
  • Sugar Needle by Corina Fastwolf and Icona Phlox. An adorable hand colored in short fanzine about candy. Distro’d by Microcosm.
  • Support. “This is a zine about supporting people who have been sexually abused”–Intro. Edited by Cindy of Doris zine fame.
  • Sweet treats, #1, September, 2004 : a collection of vegan desserts
  • Time enough at last : a reading log, by A.J. Michel. Book recommendations from prolific zine publisher and MLS holder.
  • The true heart Hilary Florido.
  • True swamp : underwoods and overtime [written and drawn by Jon Lewis]
  • Turtle, keep it steady by Joseph Lambert
  • The waiting sun : a happy town tale words and pictures by Justin Madson
  • Walk to work by Jason Turner
  • What did you buy today?? : daily drawings of purchases, May 2006 Kate Bingaman
  • Wive’s Tales, by Britton. Women’s health, reproduction, STDs, all that good stuff (including some things that might get you in trouble but really really should be available to young women). This zine has been widely reproduced, so shouldn’t be too hard to find.
  • Xerography Debt ed by Davida Gypsy Breier. Zine review zine.
  • Zine World edited by Jerianne. Zine review zine with extra zine scene content.

That’s all I’ve got for now, but will resume going through the Barnard catalog when I can keep my eyes open. posted by Jenna 2/14/2008

Integrated Milo and Miriam’s suggestions 2/15/2008.