Archive for the Cataloging Category

Zine Union Catalog Call, Nov. 22, 2014

Zine Union Catalog call
November 22, 2014, 2pm EST

Present: Milo, Jenna, Honor, Elissah, Christina, Amanda, Eric, Rhonda
Absent: Lily
Notetaker: Rhonda

Christina: synopsis of catalog models.
• Works at Columbia
• Add some notes if you want, it’s just what I’m working with
• RDF: moving on with it?
• Create and support URIs so we can create our own
• Interfaces – prob not change that much on the front-end, but we need to figure out what to do on the back end
• Transform records to whatever xZinecorex schema to be
• Xslt
• Service scripts so that when we pull out source data it will automatically get translated
• Need input from community about elements and which ones
• Need a review period
• Editing period for attribute names, URIs, with date extensions as needed, rather than Christina coming in and writing it.
• SQL-based
• Radis (?) as a data store (fact check)
• Hope: zine catalogers to go in and edit data
• Homegrown hydra heads at Columbia, but don’t know much. Collective Access?
• What level to catalog
• Indexing cataloging interface: Solr, Blacklight, but up to other suggestions
• Mapping at Solr index level and creating an interface with them? Want to offer records back. Need Eric’s expertise
• Interface for md editing, same issue
• Auto-suggest – could be nice if we create our own form/genre term, have file where it is automatically queried from interface
• Microdata—getting stuff out to search engines

Milo: question: would 1 take more dev time than the other? Defer to other more seasoned folks
• Decide on schema elements now
• [my connexion was bad here, so I may have missed something]
• Let’s ask Amanda!
• Christina; updates won’t be automatic, propagate it through the system until we can have system where they can load it. We would love to be able for folks to add changes.
• Yahoo group listserv: should have specific listervs for schema/zine cat, etc., someone to act as shepherd to review at next public meeting to report back to the group. There would be a lot of switching back and forth b/w subject term. – need to have a place to discuss
• Milo: Wikipedia talk function? Yes, good example
• JF: Decide if we suggest that all zine libraries adopt one thesaurus. Do we want to do this?
• Christina: if facets will work, we need everyone to agree. At first, you can use whatever subj auth you want, and then during ingest, we will assign term= a lot of magical mapping. How? Lcsh in fast, add fast records, there are a lot of mapping tools you can use that work pretty well, only facet in our discovery layer using fast, but that means that they must use a known vocab
• Text string mapping for local subj, but that has lower accuracy
• JF Add to survey – anchor, lcsh, local
• Eric: independent of larger stuff, worry about what we’re indexing. No matter what decisions we make, they’re a lot of decisions that need to be made afterward
• Christina: not a game changer, yes.
• Eric: models distinct of what underlying tech is going to be – then what the tech is, what interchange will be. Q’s for librarians of the group, what should be the data structure for the catalog.
• JF: Challenges of Ava Gardner model: [my connection starts getting bad here]: Christina: identifiers need to be figured out, whether or not we are linking multiple authorities or local authorities
• Christina: large community of linked data folks that will win grants, etc.
• Eric: distributed authority, distrib storage of centralized [something?].
• [….connection problem]
• bibframe is out of the scope of this, but it could be interesting to see what has worked and failed so far. Dissertations – python and other jargon
• Christina: what I’d like to see come out: use zine list serv (?) to make decisions to move on: schema, data store, interface.
• JF: should we pose this to the group if they want to hear all this stuff or if it’s just noise, or keep it small.
• Action item: to create a list serv: @QZAP
• Amanda: deadline to figure out which technology to follow. By the end of the year?
• JF: want to get survey out and back before we have a tech deadline, but not sure if which model we choose will be affected by questionnaires, but endo f year might be a good reality
• —shitty connection—-
• Elissah: Dec 31, 2014 11:59pm, suggested time
• We want Ava Gardner Model
• Milo: 20, 40, 80
• Christina: Linode is good, CU will not host. Be careful of what agreements, limits we agree on.
• JF: long-term, might do something short-term, and then we get a million dollars…Christina: we should just use Linode. Eric: find somewhere cheap to host. Not openflows to donate, but giving everyone access would be organizationally difficult, security issues. JF: budget: $10 vs $80. Eric: Do cheapest plan as possible. JF: willing to personally give $100. Christina: Kickstarter campaign? Eric: Roll yr own donation thing, not amazon (who owns kickstarter… who knew?)
• —shitty connection—f this, man!!
• In-person work session: Chicago
• Elissah: taking a break this year, but maybe she should go somewhere
• Honor’s innernets totally broke. Are we recording?
• JF: Do we need to just get surveys out and set another meeting time. Start estimating workflows. Need to figure out who as well as how much. Christina: if we got a grant, would that affect when you start a phd program? Christina: I would like to set some time aside to start data munching. I have datasets and need to schedule time, need a workout partner to keep in check. Bad about falling into rabbit holes. JF and Rhonda: help with it. JF wants Christina to get paid too, but Christina says wait to see if other folks have mad skills too. JF making sure she’s not begging on the street
• Linode– Was the name of the hosting folks (Christina) – what control over the virtual machine do they give you. Shared hosting (not sure about private hosting). For Milo, we have virtual server that we have some control over. Not sure about enterprise-level control, though. Good feedback and supportive of developers. Eric: has it good with one host, but expensive (post-funding possibility); has some names of virtual servers we could have total control over, but let’s compare Linode to their option, go based on price → action item: Who is going to do that?
• NEXT STPES: Same time every 2 weeks to discuss what’s going on, and can be a place to make decisions. Not a working day. Milo: but would like a working day to take apart xzinecorex and put it back together. Christina: use time on call to get dirty on schema.
• JF: general hate of the goog. http://zinelibraries.info/wiki/union-catalog-work-space/ also our zl work space.
• Eric: likes etherpad, ethercalc. spreadsheets can live at https://calc.mayfirst.org/
• IRC?
• Bit bucket – Christina give her login
• JF: one we just started using at barnard https://asana.com/ jira.
• Redmine, Track (confusing), Mantis (ancient)→ let’s try redmine to start. Easy to install.
• Would redmine take the place of a listserv? Naw. Keep the usual email lists going to minimize tech anxiety
• Linode: do we want to add it to Milo’s account: how to fund it. 1 year at $20/month = $240. Use paypal to get $ into an account, would like to have someone who has experience with linode to get it set up. Give $ to Milo, JF to ask the zinelibrarians list.
• Meet again in 3 weeks and talk and work or both = Dec 13. At that point, let’s do every other week, and accept that not everyone will be free every time.

 

Jenna jumping in to take notes for Rhonda

alternative from Eric’s conference:

  • smash the database model
  • GitHub
  • BIBFRAME: Jeremy Nelson, Colorado College

create a new list? survey zine librarians to see (everyone invited?)

Get surveys out

Ava Gardner wins!

Linode (?) for hosting $10-80/month, webfaction? tag (when we have funding)

  • we want to have root
  • compare linode and webfaction (virtual server), choose based on price
  • raise money on zine librarians list

ALA Midwinter: talk to the zine pavilion people about quimby’s event

Co-working

  • Rhonda can help wrangle
  • 12/13 Saturday at 2pm ET
  • need to codify zinecore

BitBucket, Assemble SVN, Jira, Trello, Redmine, Track, Mantis

 

ZINECORE zine

Here’s a zine that I put together about xZINECOREx.  Please print a copy and share with folks who are interested.

Zinecore Zine Flats

(flats updated to include correct © info for the cover artist)

xZINECOREx: Union Catalog update

Union Catalogue/xZineCorex
Update from last year: we’d started to define zinecore: Dublin Core for zines
Idea behind this is that we’ll have a metadata standard that we all accept, so that this basic set of fields will be consistent, regardless of our catalogues. AND THEN it will be the basis of our union catalogue (WorldCat for zines!!!)

ZineCore refresher:
Title
Creator(s)
Subject(s) / Genres
Content description/notes
Publisher(s)
Contributor(s)
Date of publication
Type
Format / physical description
Identifiers (union ID#)
Source
Language
Relation (see also)
Coverage (place of publication
Rights (freedoms and restrictions)

QZAP has been using zinecore in their catalogue now: hasn’t changed things necessarily, but gives a standard to shoot for

What we need to do next:
We’ve been talking about this through 4 unconferences…what’s next? Things to bring back to our cataloguers. Interference Archives in NYC also interested in starting a catalogue: maybe two groups working on this will help move things along. They are building the history of the collection as they build the catalogue. Not quite the same goals, but adds complexity.

Goal: worldcat for zines! So we all know between ourselves, but also to help point researchers to other places.

Collective Access might be the tool we build this in. Cataloging tool built on a LAMP stack, based on Dublin Core, open source, free to use. Next step for QZAP is to build an install profile — from the time you add the software, you can choose that user profile and it will pull the (in this case, zinecore) fields for that profile. CA is geared for digital objects, which is great for QZAP, but also will allow folks to add cover scans, etc.

There are other products, but this allows you to import data from comma/tab delineated files, Excel spreadsheets. Question about LibraryThing– should be able to pull as a spreadsheet? Also: MARC records should also be able to be pulled in? Some concerns with MARC fields/subfields…You can have multiple instances of DC fields.
So, there may be some human element to pull out elements one way or the other — or a script that runs to do that. But, those are also mostly easily identifiable elements, just something to know we have to do. A lot of trial and error, but.

If we’re adding to a union catalogue, will there be duplicate entries, or a field for holdings?
Zinecore is defining the object — one of the additional pieces we’ll need for the union catalogue is a Holdings record.
So — we’d use the union catalogue to find the record, then add it to our own individual catalogues. But, we’ll also have a bunch of separate records for, say, Doris — how do we clear this up?

We have an identifier for the record, but maybe also some kind of title identifier (or authority file!) to see all the Dorises. (A “work” record in RDA/FRBR-speak)
But! We don’t have professionals doing this, necessarily….
So, we need a name authority file and title authority file. So: Cindy Crabb will always be Cindy Crabb and not Cindy Ovenrack. So, you can see the other names the person goes by, but you can also redirect someone to all the things that person has published.

So, we’re talking about two sides of the catalogue: the names part is not directly about the record’s metdata.

This takes everyone using the same rules — does this fit our community?
If we build the system, it’s already there…but someone has to do the work for the Cindy Crabb/Cindy Ovenrack. Is this gonna be so large that this is necessary? Is this something that has to be done going in?
Knowing that we’re going to do this down the line…is important to know, software-set-up wise…but no, we don’t necessarily have to do it now.
Could Zinewiki be our authority file? (Yeah — people like that.) But would that just be adding a lot more work, to add Zinewiki entries? Or….can the union catalogue that would then push data back out to Zinewiki?

Unique identifier for each zine — could it be a Uniform Resource Identifier that could be linked into the semantic web? (E.g. linked back to Zinewiki?)
So Doris #3 is a part of this uniquely identified DORIS.

Question about Type — a little confusion about what it means in DC. The field is there if you need it, you can leave it blank if you don’t use it.

Authority files: you can have multiples, as long as they communicate with each other. Which goes back to having a URI, so there’s a unique key to help connect them together.

Lunch: let tech people have their tech conversations…and then come back.
What did folks want to get out if it? A plan/timeline. A way for us to know that we’re cataloging things in a way that will be useful down the line. We don’t need to be anxious about this now, y’all!
What might help the tech discussion is: talking about the quirky little things we do in cataloging. (e.g. description of the cover, a la Papercut Zine Library.)
Questions too about editions, donor information…how does that stuff fit into Zinecore? Is it separate? Extended DC?

Notes by Kelly

xZINECOREx timeline

Suggestion via UStream follower: design catalog for patrons, not for catalogers.

  • Front end and back end will be different, so perhaps this isn’t a concern
  • Multiple front ends could conceivably be available
  • Once the data is in place, there’s a lot we can do–table this part of the discussion for now?

Next steps / timeline

  • Apply for a Knight Foundation grant for development and infrastructure: DUE BY DUE DATE, JENNA & KELSEY and we hope others!
  • Develop QZAP as prototype: DUE JANUARY 1, ERIC & MILO. Lots of people willing to help with user testing.
  • Use Interference Archive catalog as prototype for sharing data
  • Research other grants: DUE ?
  • Plans for export import from CSV files, LibraryThing, MARC (from data dump), etc. (What are the others?) : Survey cataloging systems on Zine Librarians list DUE BEFORE SEPTEMBER 1, HONOR & CREW
  • Born xZINECOREx cataloging guidelines? Other documentation, as needed.
  • Union catalog admin for the user side: VIOLET

MKE ZLUC happened

Check out the notes from the Zine Librarians Unconference held in Milwaukee earlier this month. Go to the schedule page to see what was discussed and to read any notes posted.

Two highlights

Call for Workshops: 2nd Zine Librarians (un)Conference

Call for Workshops: Zine Librarians (un)Conference, ZL(u)C 2011

Milwaukee, Wisconsin

July 8-9, 2011

Calling all zine collectors, information activists, underground bibliographers and barefoot librarians! Were seeking librarians of all stripes to lead a workshop or discussion at the 2nd bi-annual (un)conference of zine librarians!

We are interested in hosting informational skillshares that might include hands-on activities, or showcase what your library has accomplished. Your workshop could describe a task, approach, or scheme that would be of interest to fellow zine librarians. We are open to new ways of approaching zine librarianship, whether your collection is housed in an institutional, public, or community library or archive.

Workshops will be scheduled into the rest of the events that will occur on July 8 and 9, 2011 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Facilitated discussions and other events will also be worked into the schedule of events by participants at the conference, in the style of bar camp and other unconferences.

Scheduled events will include a zine reading (the culmination of the Orderly Disorder: Librarian Zinesters in Circulation Tour) and tours of local zine libraries, including the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukees Special Collections and the Queer Zine Archive Project.

The first Zine Librarians (un)Conference was held in Seattle, Washington in March 2009 at Zine Archive and Publishing Project (ZAPP), to great success. The second bi-annual (un)conference is to be held July 8-9, 2011 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. For more information, or to propose a workshop, visit http://mkezluc.wikispaces.com/

Fan Magazines vs. Fanzines: Another Voice

Hi! Inspired by Jenna’s call to action, I took a stab at writing a letter to LOC on the fan magazines vs. fanzines issue myself. I’ve posted the letter, like Jenna’s addressed to Barbara Tillett, below. Not being a cataloger or someone who deals with cataloging issues on a regular basis, I realize my letter lacks the cataloging expertise, temininology or sourcing that Jenna’s does or I’m sure yours will. But hopefully every voice helps the cause…

Jeremy B.

Dear Ms. Tillett,

Good morning. My name is Jeremy Brett, and I am an archivist with Special Collections, University of Iowa. One of my projects over the last two years has been to acquire and process materials for our growing archival collections of zines. Special Collections is making a concerted effort to collect zines in all formats in order to preserve these materials and make them accessible to wider popular and research audiences. Zines are windows that provide glimpses into fascinating and often-under documented social worlds, worlds that we believe deserve to have their voices rescued from obscurity.

At the present time, we are not cataloging zines in any sort of traditional library format. However, as an information professional who deals with zines in an institutional setting I am interested in the ongoing development of uniform cataloging standards for zines. I recognize that this is more an art than a science, because of the peculiarly idiosyncratic nature of the zine medium. However, I also understand that such standards are useful both to catalogers and to interested readers and researchers. Subject headings that accurately reflect zines and related publications are key tools in the provision of access to those materials.

Thus, I am concerned with the Library of Congress recent decision to eliminate Fanzines as a 150 field and replace it with the term Fan magazines.

I believe that this decision represents a misunderstanding of the nature of both types of materials. Fanzines are decidedly not fan magazines, but separate and independent materials with their own particular history. Fanzines are non-professional publications that relate to a particular cultural genre, subject, product or phenomenon. They are most associated with science fiction fandom, within which fanzines have formed an active and integral source of fan communication since the early 1930s. In science fiction and related fandoms today, fanzines continue to be a popular mode of personal opinion and expression.

However, fanzines are not limited to science fiction fans. As an example, many members of the vast and varied world of music fans have also embraced the medium. Music fans continue to use fanzines as methods of publicizing their own musical works and those of others, particularly
those considered underground and who stand outside the traditional corporate music scene. For these artists and fans, fanzines are a vital method of making their voices heard.

For members of these and many other fandoms, the term fanzine has a storied intellectual and emotional association. It is a popular term that accurately describes a particular family of publications and that is universally recognized among, across and beyond fandoms. To replace this term with a less adequate one, I believe, does a disservice to fans and to researchers who, because of the long use of the term fanzine, are much more likely to search for materials primarily under this term than under the term fan magazines.

A fan magazine is a professionally produced publication devoted to some aspect of popular culture. While fan magazines may deal with some or all of the same subjects, topics or genres as a fanzine, the former are distinguished from the latter by their for-profit status and their more typical concern with mainstream rather than fringe aspects of their subjects. A fan magazine is a perfectly legitimate form of publication, but it is not a fanzine.

In my opinion, the Library of Congress should retain Fanzine as a 150 term rather than relegate it to the 450 field as a UF term under Fan Magazines. To continue using fan magazine as a term for fanzines (as opposed to recognizing fan magazines as a genre generally associated with fanzines) is misleading to researchers and readers alike. The two types of publications are dissimilar in their production, their authorship, their professional status, and, very often, their intellectual and creative focus. Both types deserve recognition by the Library of Congress cataloging authorities as discrete media and each type deserves its own 150 field.

Thank you for your attention.

Yours sincerely,

Jeremy Brett
Special Collections Project Librarian
Special Collections and University Archives
University of Iowa
University Libraries
100 Main Library
Iowa City, IA 52242

Fan Magazines vs. Fanzines: letter to LC from Jenna Freedman

This letter was sent to Barbara Tillett, Thompson Yee, and policy@loc.gov on October 10, 2009

To Whom It May Concern at the Library of Congress:

I want to ask you to reconsider your decision to absorb FANZINES into the new FAN MAGAZINES subject heading. I believe the two publication types are so different that even connecting them with a Related Term would be erroneous. Perhaps the defining characteristic of FANZINES is that they are self-publications that stem from subculture movements, primarily punk rock in their current incarnation, and science fiction in the 1930s. FAN MAGAZINES are commercial and mainstream, catering to celebrity culture.

Sources:

  • Wikipedia (Wikipedia is cited in the FAN MAGAZINES authority record, so I feel it is not inapropriate to use it here, as well.)
    “The term fanzine is sometimes confused with ‘fan magazine‘, but the latter term most often refers to commercially-produced publications.”
  • Merriam Webster
    “a magazine written by and for fans <a sci-fi fanzine><a punk rocker with her own fanzine>”
    No result for “fan magazine” search
  • Googlefight
    Fanzines results in a Google search: 319000 vs. “fan magazines” results: 3940
  • Anthony Slide’s website
    I am unable to review the work that inspired the change, but judging from the author’s website (presuming I have identified the correct author, which I am fairly confident that I have), his writing is entirely related to film fandom, not at all to science fiction or punk, which are the primary subjects of FANZINES.
  • Bowling Green State University Fanzines page
    “Fanzines (or zines) are magazines published by individuals or groups of individuals who have a particular subject interest or who just want to express their own ideas to the public. These are generally self-published magazines, usually issued with less than 2,000 copies, and typically have irregular publication times (i.e. not monthly or quarterly, etc.). Although most zines are pubished independently, some zines may be published similarly to standard library periodicals, including publication information, reviews, editorials, and regular numbering sequences. However, the typical zine is usually stapled together, sometimes folded and in small print, may have strings holding it together, or any other means of collating.”
  • University of California at Riverside Fanzines page
    Zero references to film or movie fan magazines.
  • Whatcha Mean What’s a Zine, The Book of Zines excerpt
    “Zines (pronounced ‘zeens,’ from fanzines) are cut-and-paste, ‘sorry this is late,’ self-published magazines reproduced at Kinko’s or on the sly at work and distributed through mail order and word of mouth. They touch on sex, music, politics, television, movies, work, food, whatever. They’re Tinkertoys for malcontents. They’re obsessed with obsession. They’re extraordinary and ordinary. They’re about strangeness but since it’s usually happening somewhere else you’re kind of relieved. You can get to know people pretty well through their zines, which are always more personal and idiosyncratic than glossy magazines because glossies and the celebrities they worship are so busy being well known.”
    [You’ll note that this definition does reference movies, but the essence of the definition is the self-published, obsessive nature of the works.]

    Also, from the author’s Master’s Thesis:
    As Fredric Wertham points out in his book “The World of Fanzines.” The word fanzine was originally an in-group slang expression used loosely and interchangeably with ‘fan-mag,’ that is fan magazine.”
    This signification of “fan magazine” differentiated the publications produced by fans from the “professional newsstand magazines” such as Amazing Stories and Weird Tales, which were referred to as “prozines”professional magazines. Fanzines were widely devoted to discussion of science-fiction and fantasy literature, and featured articles, cartoons, and fiction related to the subject, all produced by the fans themselves. In her introduction to “Some Zines,” Cari Goldberg-Janice writes that the fanzines united far-flung fans to write about “the subject they loved to talk about the mostscience fiction.”

I hope you’ll agree with me that the self-published/underground nature of FANZINES vs. the corporate/celebrity focus of FAN MAGAZINES is an essential difference. I know that the scholars that use the Zine Collection at Barnard College and other zine libraries will be poorly served by this change.

FANZINES would be better placed as a narrower term for ZINES, with other narrower terms for ZINES such as:
ART ZINES
COMPILATION ZINES (UF COMP ZINES)
DIY ZINES (UF COOK ZINES)
LITERARY ZINES (UF LIT ZINES)
MAMAZINES
MINICOMICS (UF MINI-COMICS)
PERZINES (UF PERSONAL ZINES)
POLITICAL ZINES
I give examples of each of these on the Barnard Library Zine Collection website.

It would be helpful if the terms were also usable as genre headings.

I invite you when making any future changes to FANZINES and ZINES headings to consult the Zine Librarians discussion list. Contributors give matters related to zine librarianship great thoughtfulness and expertise. We are very happy that the Library of Congress has established headings useful to our work. It is an exciting time as this specialty grows and we develop standard practices for cataloging it.

Thank you!

Jenna


Jenna Freedman, MLIS
Coordinator of Reference Services and Zine Librarian
Barnard College Library
212.854.4615
AIM, Google Talk & Yahoo: BarnardLibJenna

Zine Cataloging Adventures – Pt. The Second

If you’re reading this you may want to check Zine Cataloging Adventures – Pt. The First for background

OK, so I got the Koha box turned hooked up and turned on. It’s sitting on our local network at home behind a firewall for the momen. On first run, after it booted all the way, I logged in using the Root (god-like admin) account. After retreiving the passwords for the Koha admin account, I noticed that it (the Linux OS side of things) was acting a little goofy. Everything seemed to be up and running, though, so I ignored it for the time being.

Step 1 : Logging in to Koha

One of the great things about Koha is that it’s all web-based. Since I’m not a real librarian I don’t have anything to compare it to. I do know that in addition to Linux, Koha will run on Windows and Macintosh systems. I don’t think it will make coffee or donuts, though.

To login, I pointed my web browser at Koha’s IP address. The general (whole world) address is on the typical port for Apache (the web server software), 80. The Koha administrative interface, which is what the admins, and ultimately volunteer librarians will use is port 8080. So from Firefox I went to http://koha.qzap.org:8080 (not the real web address… YET)

I was presented with a very simple box with a place to put in Cardnumber (user name) and Password. Once I logged in, I got to the main screen.

Setting Up Koha

At this point I began to follow Koha – A Newbie Guide from the kohadocs website. You can (and maybe should) follow along in a seperate window or browser tab to see what I’m talking about.

I followed the Newbie guide closely, going through the set-up procedures. I skipped a couple of steps because right now they just don’t apply to us.

Item Types

When I got to “Item Types” in the guide, here’s what I set up:

Code (Koha requires up to 4 character codes for the item types. As I’ve discovered, this coresponds to 942c in the MARC records, and is very important later on)

CAS Audio Casette
CD – Audio Compact Disc
CMIX Comix – Zine Type, Self Published
DVD DVD Video Disc
FIC Book – Fiction
GNVL Book – Graphic Novel
MAG Magazine – *NOT* Self Published
NCSC Non-Circulating Special Collection
NFIC Book – Non-Fiction
PEPH Ephemera (mostly print) inc. flyers, posters, etc.
VHS VHS Video Casette No 0.00
VYNL Vinyl Audio Recording – Phonographic Recording
ZINE Zine – Self Published

(I copied this list from Koha… sorry that the formatting is bleah :( )

In the process I was able to specify things like rental charges or if something was non-circulating. I didn’t put in charges, but specified that NCSC (Non-Circulating Special Collection) and PEPH (print ephemera) were not for loan. Because of the nature of our collection, we have flyers, buttons, stickers, etc. that we preserve and archive. I thought that they should stay in the building. Our patrons will have access to them, but not take them home.

Borrower Catagories
The next section in the Newbie Guide is “Borrower Catagories.” Koha, for better or worse forces two catagories on you. I had to set up a “Children’s” catagory and an “Institutions” catagory. All told, I set up 5 catagories:

C – Childrens
I – Institutions
P – Patron (Just about everybody)
V – Volunteers (self explanitory)
CC – Core Collective (the core group of people making decisions about the library)

Everyone at set up got the same basic paramaters… Children are the exception, and I don’t anticipate a lot of “children” using the zine library, at least not at first.

Enrollment – 18 years
Enrollment Fee – Zero Bux
Age Required – 10 years old (except Institutions. they’ve got to be at least 18 ;) )

Issuing Rules

After Borrower Catagories is Issuing Rules. This was a huge pain in the ass. Basically, you have to set up check-out times, overdue fees, grace periods, etc. for each item type and borrower catagory. It’s a huge messy grid, and it took a little while for me to understand it.

At the end of the day, almost everyone gets to check out materials for 14 days. After that, there’s a 7 day grace period, and then the fines start at 25 a day. Patrons can also renew materials 3 times. The exceptions: Institutions get to check stuff out for 45 days, and the overdue fines are$1.00.

MARC Stuff

I’ll go into details about getting MARC records set up in Pt. The Third. Because I’m not a real librarian, this is a lot of gobbledygook to me that I’ve got a couple of real librarians helping me with. If you’re a cataloger, or have lots of expirience with this, please chime in in the comments.

See you in Zine Cataloging Adventures – The MARC of Dooooom!

Zine Cataloging Adventures – Pt. The First

A little background:

The Queer Zine Archive Project has been around for just over 4 years. We are primarily a web-based archive. We have a real interest in moving to a circulating collection, and also merging with other local (Wisconsin-based) zine librarians to cover more than just queer zines. In addition to being zinesters and collector/archivists, Chris, my partner and other co-founder of QZAP and I are both kind of technerds. While we work mostly with Macintosh systems, I’ve been dorking about with Linux for 10+years. I’m not a great linux user or an admin really, but I can get around OK. Over the next couple of weeks I’m going to post about my expiriences using F/OSS* software to get a zine cataloging system built for an independent zine library. It’s a work in progress… mistakes will be made… things will be learned…

*F/OSS Software is Free/Open Source software. We try to use this so that others can take our tools and make something for themselves.

The Setup:
Hopefully this will read like a recipe for delicous vegan cupcakes. Made with real vegans.

Ingrediants – Hardware:
800 + zines (mostly queer, but a lot of feminist, cookzines, anarcho and environmental ones thrown in, as well)
15-20 books (some about zines, others about subculture, punk, DIY, etc.)
1 barcode gun
1 Pentium 3 1U server (768MB RAM, 60GB Hard Drive, onboard NIC) that an old housemate left behind. (i.e. cheap, scavenged hardware… the kind you pay $30 for on CraigsList)

Ingrediants – Software:
CentOS 4.5 (A variant of Red Hat Linux) http://www.centos.org/

Koha ILS (open source ILS software, mostly based on the Perl programming/scripting language) http://www.koha.org

The Process

Back in September Chris was in San Francisco at the SF Zinefest. While he was out of town, I though I’d surprise him by getting the Koha box built. Since I work with lots of computer people, I asked my friend Mat to put it together. I brought him the box and told him what software I wanted installed. Linux, Koha, and Webmin, for web based administration of the machine. A week later he returned it to me, and I took him and his girlfriend out for Tiki drinks. After that, the box spent the rest of the autumn in our dining room. In December it moved to the floor of our office. On 27 December, 2007, I cleaned my office. on 28 December, I fired the Koha box up.

The machine has 7 fans in it. It sounds like a Cesna is in my office getting ready for take off whenever i turn it on. But it’s working… :)

In Pt. The Second I will talk about the system set up and how we’ve got it configured.