About jenna

Zine Librarian at Barnard College publisher of the Lower East Side Librarian Winter Solstice Shout-out, Reading Log, and one-off zines.

Favorite copyright/fair use statements in zines


I’m posting this to the zine libraries site because I want people to contribute to it, but I should also put out there that the front matter is not necessarily representative of all zine librarians everywhere, zine librarians who add their favorite intellectual property claims and disclaims from zines, or even of myself tomorrow. That said, here goes:

Unless they say otherwise, zines are protected by copyright. You can’t digitize first and ask questions later. A bunch of zines are orphan works, meaning the creators are impossible to find. You still have to try. I won’t say anything more about digitization because Kelly Wooten already said it all, in 2009. Anyway, zine digitization isn’t the point of this; it just can’t be avoided when you’re talking about copyright. In this case, I’m merely wanting to celebrate cute and clever statements zine librarians have found in zines.

  • “Copylefted because everyone owns words and I trust people to give credit”
    Libel #18: The Europe Poems by Jenna DeLorey, 1998? (postmark
  • “Reproducing/reprinting all or any part of this zine without prior consent will be considered utterly disrespectful and generally uncool.”
    Aqsa Zine #4 Ancestors + Descendents
  • “All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form, by any means, including mechanical, electric, recording or otherwise, without the prior permission of the publisher. unless its something you’re just doing because you love it and not for any commercial gain. then you can use a little part. you can always write me if you have questions. plus I’d love to know what you are doing!”
    Cindy Crabb. The Encyclopedia of Doris: Stories, Essays and Interviews. Doris Press. 2011.
  • “Anti-copyright: Going Homo may be reprinted at will for non-profit purposes, except in the case of individual articles, grafix, and other contributions copy-righted by their creators or previous publishers. It would be nice, tho, if you mentioned you found it in Going Homo.” Going Homo #3
  • “permission for reprinting with proper credit  given is happily granted as long is it’s not for jive-ass corporate greed bullshit.  if you have to ask about that part, you probably are. go to hell.” Gumption no. 3. 1995?
  • “All material herein Is owned by Its respective creators. So don’t steal — ask
    politely. And remember to always give credit where credit Is due.”
    Queer Nasty #5.
  • “No part of this publication may be reproduced without permission by Julia. You may, however, attempt to persuade/woo her with cookies, beer, or high school handjobs.”
    Julia Wertz. The Fart Party #1, 2006.
  • “No part of this zine may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form, by any means, including mechanical, electric, recording or otherwise without the prior permission from its creator. Unless you’re just printing it for funzies & not for commercial gain. \_("/)_/
    (ascii art reproduced as best I could)
    Infinity Dots. Take Two: Escape from the Bayou, 2016.
  • Copyrights are silly, and we can’t keep you from stealing our shit, but maybe please don’t?
    Brook and Felicia, The Most Important Zine of the Day, 2014
  • Published by Mutya Inc.©.  And if you even dare copy the stuff in this issue for your own purposes and say it came from your own lips, be prepared to stay home a lot, lest I sick my headhunters on you!
  • Sabrina. Bamboo Girl #1. 1995.

Please add yours, either right in the post, or in the comments.

Input, please!

Multiple groups of zine librarians are developing a codes of ethic (name might change) and want feedback from zine creators, zine readers, zine librarians, zine scholars and whoever all else wants to give their input.

REVISIONS for REVIEW

Code of ethics revision – Access (saving it as a G document to see if that will better facilitate collaboration)
Code of ethics revision – Use
Code of ethics revision – Acquisitions (Heidy’s updates at the bottom, still in progress)

 

FIRST DRAFTS

Code of ethics draft preamble
Code of ethics draft – Access
Code of ethics draft- Privacy
Code of Ethics Draft: Use
Code of Ethics – Acquisitions
Code of Ethics Draft – Subject Analysis

Please provide your feedback in the comments for each separate page. If that’s burdensome, share feedback some other way! You can email Jenna Freedman if you want. The due date is February 14th at midnight your time. Thanks!

Help an unemployed zine librarian (or two) get to the zine librarians unconference

This year two of our regular ZLUC participants won’t be able to make it to the conference in Austin because their former employers are at least a little bit douchey. Let’s see if we can help ’em out! Paypal your donation to jennafree@bigfoot.com, Venmo it to leslzine, or mail a check to Jenna Freedman | 203 Rivington St. #3C | NYC, NY 10002.

A straw that led to the one of the zine librarians quitting her job: http://judevachon.tumblr.com/post/117781855023/stop

The other one lost her job (after ten years pre- and post-MLS) when her position was deemed nonessential–“But can you help us with department planning before you go?” Like the other out-of-work librarian, she’d been a creative and proactive employee, founding the zine library, for example.

Donations so far: $360 + dorm room

$50 from a research & instruction librarian in New York
$30 from a zine archivist in Texas
$50 from a zine librarian in New York
$50 from a librarian in North Carolina
$40 from a librarian in Illinois
$40 from two wannabe zine librarians in Arkansas
$50 from a zine librarian in New York’s bonus mother
dorm room fee from an anonymous source
$50 from a zine librarian in Massachusetts

Surveys for Zine Makers and Zine Librarians

Darlings, a band of zine librarians is working to develop a catalog that would contain information about zines held in multiple libraries–one place you could go and find zines and determine who has them. We want to know what you think about that. To that end, we’ve made two surveys:

one for zine creators, readers and scholars

and one for zine librarians and archivists.

Please fill out one or both, as appropriate to your role(s) in zinedom.

Thank you! Blame/credit for the surveys goes to Madeline Veitch and me, with thanks to people who gave us feedback (MM, LD, ES, SSL, MG, E).

Survey squirrels, licensed for reuse from http://3dstage.deviantart.com/art/Survey-Says-263258911
Survey squirrels from Deviant Art

ZLUC Travel Grant 2014

For the third consecutive year, zine librarians & their friends are raising money to subsidize a librarian of color’s participation in the Zine Librarians Unconference. Here is the application form. Applications due June 6, 2014.

2012
2013

This year’s conference will be held at Duke University’s Sallie Bingham Center for Women’s History & Culture July 18-20.

So far librarians have contributed $215 and $217.25 was raised at the NYC Feminist Zine Fest on March 1st for a total of $487.25. The Sallie Bingham Center will cover the winner’s single dorm room, as well.

Contribute via PayPal to jennafree@bigfoot.cxx. For other options and more info, email leslzine@gmail.cxx. (Wherein xx = om)

Unreproductive: Zines on Herbal Abortion and Menstrual Extraction

Here are some zines that discuss or even detail ways to end a pregnancy. Please be careful with how you carry out instructions found in a zine, or really any information resource. Neither I nor anyone from the zine librarians group is taking responsibility for the content found in the zines. Zines do not go through a peer review process and most zine makers do not have significant medical training. That doesn’t mean they don’t have valid knowledge about their own bodies and yours, but, just, don’t be reckless.

So here is a selective, annotated list, alphabetically by title:

  1. Doris #23 by Cindy Crabb, published in 2006.
    An explanation of menstrual extraction is just one part of this issue Cindy Crabb’s rightfully celebrated personal zine. In addition to ME, you’ll also read about Cindy’s grandma, outdoor adventures and the lasting effects of childhood sexual abuse. The zine is illustrated with stick figure comics and drawings in Cindy’s inimitable style. Cindy and Doris are hard not to love.
    Held at: Bako Zine Library, Barnard Zine Library/Columbia University, Bingham Center/Duke University, Carnegie Library of PittsburghDenver Zine Library, Multnomah County Library, Nadine Vorhoff Library/Tulane UniversityPierce County Library System, Timberland Regional Library. You can also buy it from Cindy and from a bunch of distros (which you can look up on your own).
  2. Fertility Awareness for Non-Invasive Birth Control, by the Arthouse Coalition, Portland OR
    I’m a sucker for a DIY zine that includes a bibliography and glossary, which this one does. As the title suggests, this zine is more about knowing your body and preventing pregnancy than it is about abortion, but it does contain information about herbal emmenagogues. And if you want to know a lot about cervical fluid, this is the zine for you!
    Held at: Bingham Center/Duke UniversityFirefly Zine collection/University of MiamiInternet Archive (options for viewing and download), Papercut Zine Library, Schlesinger Library/HarvardZineLibrary.info (pdf)
  3. Free to Choose: a Women’s Guide to Reproductive Freedom, by Esther Eberhardt. (Note the Eberhardt Press catalog title leave’s out the word “Women’s,” hence some irregularity in library catalogs.
    In addition to being pretty this pamphletty zine provides history and context (stories from the “bad old days,” The Abortion Handbook, Jane), as well as information about menstrual extraction tools and procedures. It includes a short list of bibliographical references and is anti-copyright.
    Held at: AnarchaLibrary (link to pdf), Barnard Zine Library/Columbia University, Bingham Center/Duke University, Birds Nest Zine LibraryBrooklyn College,  Carnegie Library of PittsburghCleveland Health Science Library, Eberhardt Press (pdf), Evergreen State College Womyn’s Resource CenterHampshire CollegeMount Royal UniversitySchlesinger Libary/Harvard, Timberland Regional LibraryUniversity of Oregon, Vancouver Public Library
  4. Hot Pantz: Do It Yourself Gynecology, by Isabelle Gauthier and Lisa Vinebaum, 1995
    This is a classic women’s repro health DIY guide, originally published in French. Includes emmenagogues and advice for what to do to prevent pregnancy after a risky sexual encounter.
    Held at: Barnard Zine Library/Columbia University, Bingham Center/Duke UniversityBitchMedia Community Lending Library, Bowling Green State University, Carnegie Library of PittsburghCleveland Health Science Library, Duke University/Bingham Center, Multnomah County Library, Firefly Zine Collection/University of MiamiNo Borders Radical Lending Library (link to pdf that isn’t working for me), Roberts Street Social Centre, Timberland Regional LibraryUniversity of Oregon
  5. Mine: an Anthology of Women’s Choices, edited by Meredith Stern, 2002.
    You won’t necessarily get the recipe for an herbal abortion or instructions for performing menstrual extraction. What this compilation zine will provide is other women’s stories about medical and surgical abortions, herbal abortifacients, menstrual extractions and the women’s thought processes behind their decisions.
    Held at: Barnard Zine Library/Columbia University, Bingham Center/Duke University, Labadie Collection/University of MichiganSchlesinger Library/Harvard University, Wisconsin Historical Society
  6. Radical Menstruation, 2004.
    Here’s the Barnard zine abstract: This political zine gives alternative ways to view and deal with menstruation, focusing on herbal and DIY remedies. It also critiques of the “culture of shame and ignorance” surrounding menstruation, provides a bibliography, and provides instructions on how to make a cloth pad or perform a menstrual extraction.
    Held at: Barnard Zine Library/Columbia University, Bowling Green State University
  7. Red Alert #3, by the Blood Sisters collective, early 2000s?
    Contains an emmenagogue recipe.
    Held at: Barnard Zine Library/Columbia University, Bingham Center/Duke University, OPIRG Infoshop
  8. She’s So Very, by Melissa Ann, 2008?
    Mostly a personal zine, about a lot of topics, this zine also includes an emmenagogue recipe–and interviews with Le Tigre band members about feminism, if you’re into that sort of thing.
    Held at Barnard Zine Library/Columbia University, Brooklyn College
  9. What Is This Thing Called M.E.? 2006 or later?
    Personal, DIY, cut and paste goodness–how have I never heard of this zine before?
    Held at: Papercut Zine Library (spreadsheet of holdings), pdf from unidentified source (RAM sucking download that might freeze your browser for a while)
  10. Wive’s Tales by Britton, 1993
    Here’s the Barnard abstract to another classic zine that still shows up at books fairs, zine fests and in distros, 20 years after it was published): This political DIY zine gives alternatives routes to female reproductive health. Included are guides to self-examination and forms of birth control, emmenagogues, and childbirth, as well as descriptions of diseases and tips for radical menstruation. There are illustrations and a bibliography.
    Held at: Barnard Zine Library/Columbia University, Bingham Center/Duke University, DePaul University (Kim Nolan collection), Forgotten Zine ArchiveInternet Archive (options for viewing and download), Smith CollegeTamiment Library/NYU, University of Iowa

Note, re: library holdings. I searched WorldCat and did an internet search. I have surely missed other libraries, whose catalogs are not online or whose holdings are not otherwise represented on the open web or for whatever reason don’t show up very high on a results list. Librarians should feel encouraged to add their holdings in this post or in the comments for me to integrate as I am able.

XD Tribute to Zine Librarians

In Xerography Debt #33, editor Davida Gypsy Breier says nice things about us:

“As a zinemaker, I often go about my business of making zines because I still believe in tangible artifacts. Or, as Jeff Somers says in his column in this issue, they have discreteness. I forget that with print runs frequently fewer than 500, or even 100 copies, zines are often ephemeral. I knew that zine collections at libraries exist, and have contributed to several, but it wasn’t until after the [Caxton Club zine] symposium that it really sunk in that these librarians and archivists are unsung heroes of zine culture. They are saving and preserving documentation on events and subcultures that would otherwise go unrepresented or be grossly misrepresented. They are also working to make zines discoverable to new readers.

“So I would like to dedicate this issue to the zine librarians and archivists out there who are working to support and protect zines. Thank you!”

Aw, shucks, Davida! It’s our pleasure. 🙂