ZLuC travel grant for POC librarians/archivists

For the fourth year, zine librarians, archivists, & their friends are subsidizing a librarian of color’s (including aspiring ones) participation in the 2016 Zine Librarians (un)Conference in Boston, Massachusetts on July 29th and 30th at Simmons College.

We recognize an underrepresentation of people of color (POC) in previous Zine Librarians (un)Conferences, and it is because we value the contributions, leadership, and presence of POCs at the conference that we offer this travel grant. Grant winners may spend the money however they see fit, e.g., airfare, childcare, food, etc. (Registration is free for everyone.) 

To apply for the travel fund, please fill out this form.

To donate to the travel fund, send money via PayPal to diannelaguerta at gmail dot com (or just click the Paypal donate button in the sidebar). Thank you for your support!

Mental Health Zines

As part of LIS Mental Health Week, the Zine Librarians listserv crowdsourced a list of zines related to mental health that we love.

zines with personal narratives of mental health/illness
April Fools Day, by Kathleen Hanna
Kathleen Hanna, lead singer of riot grrrl band Bikini Kill, writes about her struggle with alcoholism and its effect on her life in this personal zine. Also included are non-destructive ways to get high, things that are better when sober, and a conversation about addiction with Brian Starhawk of Fitz of Depression. Read it in a library.

Clark 8, by Megan Gendell
A college student documents her stay in a mental health ward. Read it in a library.

Collide: on physical and mental health, edited by JC Parker
This compilation zine put together by JC presents personal essays from people living with physical disabilities and some form of mental illness including debilitating migraines, PTSD, suicidal ideation, brain injury, chronic pain, rheumatoid arthritis, depression, seizures, deafness and anxiety. Many of the contributors, including one who is genderqueer, have a family history of alcoholism and/or have their own issues with addiction. Contributors include Maranda Elizabeth, Kerri Radley and Sara Bear. There are also photographs, illustrations and recommended resources. Read it in a library, or buy from Stranger Danger Distro.

Doll Hospital, by Bethany Lamont
“It’s an art and literature mental health journal which encourages an intersectional focus. Rooted in self-advocacy, it centres the voices of those who are largely unheard in the mainstream narrative of mental health. It aims to be an alternative and does an excellent job of it. It takes submission from anyone who has experienced mental health illness firsthand and wants to talk about it in their own words and on their own terms.” (Quoted from this interview with the creator.) Buy from their website.

Filling the Void: Interviews about quitting drinking and using, edited by Cindy and Caty Crabb
A collection of interviews with people who have quit drinking or using drugs, about why they quit, the process, and their experiences.
Buy from Doris Zine Distro.

Functionally Ill (multiple issues) by Laura-Marie
In this zine, subtitled “Adventures with Mental Health” and “becoming bipolar”, Laura-Marie discusses what depression and mania feel like for her and describes her voices. Read in a library, or buy from the author.

Get a grip: travels through my mental health by Sarah Tea-Rex
Subjects: Sexual consent, Adult child sexual abuse victims. Download the pdf from the author.

Pathologize this!: a zine about mental health, edited by Sarah Tea-Rex, Rachel and Iris E.
Pathologize This! shares people’s mostly autobiographical stories of their experiences with mental illness. Issue 1 chronicles life with obsessive-compulsive disorder, eating disorders, alcoholism, chronic pain, depression, anxiety disorders, and as a sexual abuse survivor. There is also an essay about Elliott Smith and how many people use music to cope with illness. Issue 2 features writings on Attention Deficit Disorder, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, manic depression, unnecessarily prescribed medications, suicide attempts, and the story of an artist turning their an anxiety disorder into a project. Download issue 1 and issue 2 from the authors.

Srviv 1-3, edited by Jonas
Some of the world’s best zine writers answer the question “Why I get out of bed every morning.” The results are beautiful, challenging, and inspiring. Buy from Antiquated Future distro or others.

Think About the Bubbles (multiple issues) by Joyce Hatton
“#8 A illustrated zine about my breast cancer journey, getting sober, depression, my suicide attempt, homelessness, and how breast cancer ended up making my life really awesome. #9 I went on the POC Zine Project Race Riot Tour. I learned a lot about racism, internalized racism, and how living my life in North and South Dakota has affected me. #11 A story about my lifelong BFF named Anxiety, and our destructive relationship. Lots of illustrations. #13 Mental health things, my relationship with my mother, purse-clutching, and birds. Also cancer, the Simpsons, and videogames. #14 A short comic about mental illness and isolation. Contains surreal and potentially disturbing imagery.” Read in a library or buy from the author.

“Unhealthy” : on coping with pain in socially inappropriate ways by Mika
Mika, a childhood sexual abuse survivor, challenges the recommended compulsory positivity approach to coping with personal and external (e.g., massive earthquake in Japan) trauma and instead argues that there is no “healthy” or “unhealthy” way to cope. She outlines her personal, albeit controversial, strategies, including lowering her expectations, thinking about her own irrelevance in the world, pondering the practicality of suicide after her own failed attempt, and affiliating with Buddhism. This zine is issued with a trigger-warning.

Wax and Feathers, by members of The Icarus Project
“In expressing our feelings, insights, and ideas about madness and the world around us we hope to inform and inspire others. The stories told by the psychiatric establishment, pharmaceutical industry, and the mainstream media all to often overshadow our own. By sharing our stories with others we can reclaim the right to define ourselves and our experiences. We choose to honor our uniqueness and complexity by letting our voices be heard.” Download from the Icarus Project.

self-care zines
The bad day book by LB Lee
“Made to be folded up and put in your wallet, this is a little pocket zine intended for general mental health crisis situations–dissociative episodes, psychotic episodes, suicidality, stuff like that. Obviously, this is not a replacement for a thorough crisis plan, just a quick and dirty resource for when you’re not thinking clearly.” Buy from the author.

Ease your mind: herbs for mental health, by Janet Kent
This zine serves as “a primer on the use of medicinal herbs to support mental health.” Arranged by symptom rather than by plant, each entry includes the plant’s common and Latin name, and a description of what kinds of symptoms or emotional states they are best suited to address, including anxiety, depression, grief, and insomnia. Includes a section on dosage and contraindications, a glossary, bibliography, and a brief overview of how to make teas, decoctions, and tinctures. Read in a library, or buy from the author.

Eat this sandwich by LB Lee
“Made to be folded up and put in your wallet, this is a little pocket zine intended to fight restriction urges–the psychological compulsion not to eat. Obviously, this is not a replacement for a thorough treatment plan, just a quick and dirty resource for when you’re having trouble getting food into your face. Methods true and tested!” Buy from the author.

Feeling worthless? by LB Lee
“Made to be folded up and put in your wallet, this is a tiny little pocket zine intended to help deal with… well, feelings of worthlessness.” Read in a library, or buy from the author.

The worth of water: a compzine about self-care, edited by Sarah Rose
This compzine provides articles on stress relief activities and self-care. Contributors in their 20s and 30s talk about their love for John Waters films, making films, activist burnout coping techniques, and overcoming addiction. Contributors include Sage Adderly (Tattooed Memoirs), Sarah Arr! (Tazewell’s Favorite Eccentric), Laura-Marie (Functionally Ill), JC (Tributaries), and others. The zine also includes recipes, illustrations and a list of resources. Read in a library.

Other fantastic lists of mental health zines available at: https://bitchmedia.org/article/cut-paste-zines-about-mental-health-and-self-care AND http://www.soularbliss.com/2012/07/31/radical-self-care-and-community-care-zine-resources/

Librarians + zinesters January zine reading

UPDATE JAN. 6: EVENT CANCELLED:  We’ve had to cancel his event at Papercut Zine Library, apologies for the late notice!

There will be a zinester / librarian zine reading at Papercut Zine Library on the evening of Saturday January 9th (during ALA Midwinter). We’re looking for folks who would like to read from their zine (or someone else’s), so please get in touch if you’d like to participate (violetfox at the gmails or @violetbfox).

Details: Saturday January 9th 2016 at 6 pm
Papercut Zine Library, 10 Ward St, Somerville MA
Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/509940182511594/

flyer for Boston January 2016 zine reading event

Zine union catalog at mashcat event

For those who are in the Boston area or will be attending the American Library Association’s Midwinter conference, consider joining us for a brainstorming forum on the Zine Union Catalog project on Wednesday January 13th during the Mashcat event at Simmons College. We’ll be discussing what we’ve accomplished so far and entertaining ideas about how we can move forward most effectively.

Mashcat, in their words, “is a loose group of metadata specialists, cataloguers, developers and anyone else with an interest in how metadata in and around libraries can be created, manipulated, used and re-used by computers and software.” The full schedule for the day-long event is available here: http://www.mashcat.info/2016-event/ Registration for the day is full, but if you’d like to attend our session (from 3:30-4:15), get in touch.

Code of Ethics November 2015 final draft

The November 2015 edition is now available in beautiful zine format for printing (pdf) or as a boring Word document. (The pdf version above is slightly revised, with contact information and a Creative Commons license.)

Thanks to Kelly Wooten for the lovely work creating the zine formatted version. And thanks again to everyone who’s contributed–if you contributed and your name isn’t on the list, please let us know by emailing zinepavilion at gmail.

For your attachment-viewing pleasure:
Zine-Librarians-Code-of-Ethics_FINAL-DRAFT *

Big thanks to Joshua and Jeremy for getting the final draft ready! Thanks to everyone who’s contributed–please get in touch with Jeremy or Joshua to have your name added to the list of contributors at the end of the document.

*updated version with list of contributors

*****
Updated to add the zine version:
Zine Librarians Code of Ethics Zine

Code of Ethics Documents

A buncha zine librarians and non-zine/librarians have been working on a Zine Librarian Code of Ethics. Earlier we posted parts of the Code for your review and comments. Here is the Code in one document for your (hopeful) final review. There are questions that came out of this round of edits, and I seek the advice of the group. Please comment if you wish. And thank so much for your time!

xoxo

Rhonda

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1MiGC903tZhBuNBqVWQSDWkm8pxRB-yjHvDaC115hYtI/edit?usp=sharing

 

Input, please!

Multiple groups of zine librarians are developing a codes of ethic (name might change) and want feedback from zine creators, zine readers, zine librarians, zine scholars and whoever all else wants to give their input.

REVISIONS for REVIEW

Code of ethics revision – Access (saving it as a G document to see if that will better facilitate collaboration)
Code of ethics revision – Use
Code of ethics revision – Acquisitions (Heidy’s updates at the bottom, still in progress)

 

FIRST DRAFTS

Code of ethics draft preamble
Code of ethics draft – Access
Code of ethics draft- Privacy
Code of Ethics Draft: Use
Code of Ethics – Acquisitions
Code of Ethics Draft – Subject Analysis

Please provide your feedback in the comments for each separate page. If that’s burdensome, share feedback some other way! You can email Jenna Freedman if you want. The due date is February 14th at midnight your time. Thanks!

Zine Librarians Code of Ethics: Use

Whereas “access” is getting to read and look at online archives, or in places like zine libraries, zine fairs, or special collections reading rooms, “use” means reproducing or quoting from zines. Reproduction can include copying zines in their original formats and redistributing them; printing portions in books; or any kind of online sharing, from comprehensive archive projects, to publishing images online newspapers, blogs, or any form of social media. This section should guide yourself and others when it comes to questions of zine use best practices and ethics regarding copyright and seeking permissions (and using citations!)

Most importantly, we consider ourselves members of a community:  As zine makers and zine librarians, our practices are not just about what’s legal, but also about what’s respectful to the people and the work.

 

Copyright and Ethical Use

The U.S. copyright code has a special section for libraries, allowing librarians to make copies for researchers to use for their own research. This assumes you won’t be sharing it or reproducing it in any way. If you do want to reproduce something, copyright law requires that you ask permission from authors (there are time restrictions on these, but we’re assuming that you’re mostly going to be working with late 20th century and contemporary authors, so these won’t apply). If you are reproducing for educational purposes or significantly transforming the original, your use may fall under Fair Use (discussed further below).

However, in our experience, reproducing or sharing zines is not just about copyright. It’s also about zinesters’ right to decide how their work is distributed and how widely, and how it is contextualized. It’s also about community, respect, and just being a nice person.

Zines are not like mass-distributed books. They are often self-published and self-distributed, and sometimes printed in very small runs, intended for a small audience. In addition, perzines are by definition “personal,” and zinesters may feel different about having their zines distributed in print than they would about having them openly available on the internet or print. This can be especially true in the case of “historical” zines in library collections — for example, a teen girl writing a zine for her close friends in 1994 may not want her zine distributed online or in print 20 years later.

Some zinesters also feel that context is important. This can mean the format – that it was meant to be on paper, and held in the hands – or it can mean that the zine works best when it’s read as a whole, rather than having one or a few pages excerpted or reprinted.

 

Asking for permission

There are many different uses of zines you should seek permission for. For students and researchers who want to use excerpts or even images in an academic paper that isn’t going to be published in print or online, a citation is usually enough. [See “Cite this Zine” zine: https://zines.barnard.edu/sites/default/files/inline/citethis2010.pdf]  If you want to publish an image from a zine in print or online, we recommend obtaining permission from authors. There are some gray areas or casual uses that zinesters may not usually request permission for, like posting a picture from a zine or the cover on Twitter or Instagram or in a blog, usually with a short credit including the title of the zine and/or the author. Copying an entire zine, even for personal use, is generally not a respectful practice unless the creator specifies copyleft or appropriate Creative Commons permissions.

In cases where you are not planning to reproduce a zine, researchers or journalists writing extensively about a particular zine creator or community should get in touch with those people directly. The zine library holding their works is not a proxy for the people who created them.

Whenever you reproduce or describe a zine online, in social media, in a library catalog or website, or other venue, if the zine creator(s) contact you and request that you remove the content or edit it, we recommend respecting their wishes. You may be able to argue fair use based on these principles: (1) the purpose of the use; (2) the nature of the work used; (3) the amount and substantiality of the work used; and (4) the effect of the use upon the potential market for or value of the work used. However, in our community, it’s not just about what’s legal, it’s about what’s respectful. We advise getting explicit permission whenever possible.

What does asking for permission mean? If you are publishing a book or academic article, the editor or publisher may provide you with their official form to get a signature. You can create your own form if you are working independently. If you use a formal letter, we recommend writing a more conversational email explaining who you are and what you are seeking.

What to include (from the Purdue Library website):

  1. Your name, address, telephone number, and email address.
  2. Your title/position and name of any institution you might be affiliated with.
  3. The date of your request.
  4. A complete and accurate citation.
  5. A precise description of the proposed use of the copyrighted material as well as when and for how long the material will be used.
  6. A signature line for the copyright holder including their title if they are representing a company and the date.

Tracking down the creator of a zine can be difficult, particularly for those published in the 1990s (pre-internet/email times) or under a pseudonym. If you can find contact info on the zine, try using that, or using google to search for an email address, blog, facebook account, etc., to make your request. The zine librarians email list [https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/zinelibrarians/info] or other online forums may be helpful in tracking down people. Document your efforts to contact the person. If you are doing a project with multiple zines that require permission, use a spreadsheet to keep track of when/how you attempted contact. This will not completely protect you legally, but it is important to do your due diligence in this process. If a zine has more than one author, you may need to contact the editor (if there is one clear person) as well as the creator of the content you wish to use. Locating one of those people will most likely lead you to the others. Sometimes if a zine was created collectively, one person may feel authorized to speak for the group, and in other cases, they may wish to each individually give permission for the usage.

Guide to copyright permissions:

https://www.lib.purdue.edu/uco/Resources/permissions.html

Fair Use for Libraries:

http://www.arl.org/focus-areas/copyright-ip/fair-use/code-of-best-practices#.VG9HuYvF_To

 

Research Guide Page for zinelibraries.info notes from ZLuC 2015

RESEARCH GUIDE PAGE

Kelly McElroy, Honor Moody, Dianne Laguerta, Jennifer LaSuprema and Jude Vachon at ZLuC 2015 bar time.

Questions we’d like to address on page:

 

  • What info can you get from zines? Why use zines in your research?
  • Challenges in researching zines? e.g. metadata
  • Resources for researching zines:
  1. zinewiki – can we reach out 1x/yr to ask people to update zinewiki entries?
  2. info
  3. zinelibrarians yahoo group
  4. Google zine libraries/archives map
  • Particular areas, examples of richness, that zines do well with e.g. health, queer zines, trans zines, punk music… – we can link here to lists we made/are going to make of zines in particular categories
  • ALTHOUGH zines are about absolutely anything/everything

 

We also thought it would be good to post a sample research guide on one subject e.g. bikes.

 

PS Can we have a Donate Zines page on zinelibraries.info?

Session 1a: Zine Union Catalog Update, ZLuC

In Milwaukee we decided we needed a metadata standard that is interchangeable between folks who work as barefoot librarians and academic and public libraries.

Last year (2014 in NC): we will have breakout groups. Since September we’ve had a core group (Jenna, Milo, Honor, Rhonda, Alyssa, Eric, Christina), and we’ve had teleconferences/work sessions every 2 weeks

Notes are all on etherpad: http://etherpad.wikimedia.org/p/zineunioncatalog

Current conversation: we’re ready to start building a union catalog and wondering what that means:

Soliciting funds for server space ($140 of $240 annual fee through in-house fundraising)

Taking xxZINECORExx and mapped it to Dublin Core terms. Currently lives at GitHub: https://github.com/MiloQZAP/xZINECOREx ,  https://github.com/MiloQZAP/xZINECOREx/blob/master/MAP/MAP_1.csv

Each of the fields has a scope note in the field.

Things that got codified during our work:

Genre terms in terms of Content and Form of material:

Form vs. Content:

Type, carrier type: print, audio, video, e-zine

Content: subject matter (e.g., cook zine, diy zine, do we want hierarchies?, fanzine, literary zine) –> we need to work on equivalencies and/or hierarchies… e.g., Parent zines and sub topic: mama zine, papa zine

Genre form: 24-hour zine, APA zines (Amateur press association)

We would like to have a preferred term for things that is local to an institution but refers to the preferred vocabulary term.

Pull from different vocabularies like local taxonomies

Anchor archive vocabulary is already accessible via linked open data (thanks to: ____ — please fill in the name?)

There was a need for scope notes to allow for inclusive catalog with different vocabularies so we added scope notes for terms for disambiguate

Difference institutions will share all their information — collection metadata that will be ingested into the union catalog. In local catalog, there may be more or less fields but can be individualized for a local library. In essence, every record will probably need to be touched at the local level.

Question: a lot of zine libraries haven’t cataloged all their zines. It’s a great resource but it would be great for crowd-sourcing. Yes… this is cooperative cataloging — you add titles and you can download your titles too.

small archives that don’t have professional archivists and this might help folks who don’t have staff to catalog — we could help with technical aspects or funding, even. Scope notes should help to make the ease of access without a lot of training. Should be able to prepopulate and make it easily ingestible.

Serials vs monographs — flexibility to use the metadata and tweak it to work in their own collection. Like use a serial record even if you only have one of the issues.

We don’t have a lot of required fields so if you have minimal data, you can still participate.

Provenance to the cataloging itself: We would have institutional/administrative metadata so we could tell who created the record.

Platform to use? We will probably start that this afternoon… might be one that already exists (Collective Access? or our own?) — need some tech consultations starting tomorrow too.

**Need linked data specialist, technical folks. We will share the link to the email listserv. http://lists.qzap.org/listinfo.cgi/zlunioncat-qzap.org

**Outreach would be super important — make a zine about it. Jude is moved by all this work by all this content and its creators. Resources: making the most of all of our resources and so are all of the people who work on them, makes it that much more powerful.

**Sequel to xxZINECORExx zine that Milo did a few years ago.

Allison at U. of Florida: published an article on cataloging zines in RDA: project of articulating why what we do as cataloging zines matter — if you already know the theory and need to share the greater work and empower people to use the great knowledge they have of their collections and how that enriches the greater knowledge of the collective collections of everyone.

** show locations of zines like worldcat but not evil.

**Readerware (?) separate databases for books and periodicals and zines are subhierarchy of periodical. 2009 link to what is a zine and what is not a zine. Jenna to post on twitter now. Zine vs. chapbook? Has an ISSN? Not a zine. http://zinelibraries.info/2009/03/18/not-a-zine/

What do we consider a zine? Fanzines? (Riverside that focus on scifi zines).

NEXT STEPS: we might be at the point for needing a tech consultant to guide group toward grants to apply for.

human resource: coding/paying for work; how do we communicate to let everyone work outside of silos.

Jude: wants to work on zine vol. 2 whenever that happens/matters

***How do we keep updated? we don’t post much on the listserv, should we? Or should we post a summary of zineunioncatalog meetings to the zinelibaries.info and provide a link to the listserv as well… as long as we include pictures of cats.

www.cornify.com